Ron Eringa

About me

As an independent consultant I develop Leadership on all levels of the organisation, by helping:

  • Managers become true Agile Leaders that develop inspiring workplaces
  • Scrum Masters develop self-organized, high performing teams
  • Product Owners to create an environment where teams develop brilliant ideas and valuable products

As a Professional Scrum Trainer I deliver high quality trainings for Scrum.org

My Career

I started my career in 2000, working for organizations who use software to help their customers become successful. I discovered that the profession of developing Software is extremely complex and requires a lot of creativity.
What I also discovered is that a lot of my colleagues were smart and creative individuals, but they got stuck in bureaucracy, slow decision making and extensive long-term planning.
Then in 2004, this changed when I first discovered Scrum & XP!
Not only did I see teams having fun while being creative, but what was even greater is that customers and end users were happy too!
From that moment on I decided to embrace this new way of working. First as a developer, Scrum Master & Product Owner and later as a consultant, trainer & coach.
In these roles I learned how Leaders can:

  • Create a working environment that is suitable for Scrum to be effective
  • Help Scrum team members to get the best out of their role
  • Create different HR practices to facilitate a Scrum team in doing this
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My mission

Although I have seen many great Scrum teams, there are even more teams that never reach their full potential.
I see it as my mission to help these teams create Agile Leadership, where:

  • People are more important than ideas
  • Teams continuously focus on building high quality, high value solutions for customers
  • People continuously improve and develop each other
  • People trust each other, even when they make mistakes
  • Failure is a necessary consequence of doing something new